Rachel Boutagy

Rachel is an Exercise Scientist, Fitness Trainer, Wife and Mum to two beautiful daughters. Having been qualified in exercise science for over 25 years, she's been fortunate to work alongside some of the leading authorities in the fitness industry. Rachel has a wealth of knowledge in health and nutrition, through her significant amount of evidence based research she has conducted throughout the years.

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Whey protein reduces your appetite more than any other food.

Whey protein reduces your appetite more than any other food.
Whey protein reduces appetite, and reduces subsequent energy intake compared with other protein sources. Learn more...

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Pure Vanilla Bean Whey Protein

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Different dietary proteins vary in their ability to influence satiety and reduce food intake.

The British Journal of Nutrition published a study on the effects of four protein meals on insulin, glucose, appetite and energy intake.
This was a clever study, looking at the ability of various protein foods to effect both blood glucose and insulin levels and feelings of fullness and food intake in subsequent meals in the day.

Of the four protein foods tested, whey performed the best in increasing fullness and satisfaction (satiety) and reducing later food intake.

Having a glass of natural whey with breakfast is a great idea to increase morning protein levels and decrease appetite later in the day, thus eating less.

"Whey protein meal produced a greater insulin response, reduced appetite and decreased ad libitum energy intake at a subsequent meal compared with the other protein meals, indicating a potential for appetite suppression and weight loss in overweight or obese individuals."
The present study compared the effects of four protein meals, whey, tuna, turkey and egg albumin, on postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations as well as on appetite measures and energy intake in twenty-two lean, healthy men.

This was a randomised, cross-over design study where participants consumed four liquid test meals on separate occasions followed by the collection of regular blood samples (fasting, +30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min).

They were then offered a buffet meal 4 h later. The blood glucose response after the consumption of the test meal, as an incremental area under the curve (AUC), was significantly lower with the whey meal than with the turkey and egg meals, but it was not lower than with the tuna meal.

The AUC blood insulin after the consumption of the test meal was significantly higher with the whey meal than with the tuna, turkey and egg meals.

The AUC rating of hunger was significantly lower with the whey meal than with the tuna, turkey and egg meals.

Mean energy intake at the ad libitum meal was significantly lower with the whey meal than with the tuna, egg and turkey meals. There was a strong relationship between self-rated appetite, postprandial insulin response and energy intake at lunch.

The whey protein meal produced a greater insulin response, reduced appetite and decreased ad libitum energy intake at a subsequent meal compared with the other protein meals, indicating a potential for appetite suppression and weight loss in overweight or obese individuals.
Want to check out our Australian Grass-Fed Whey Protein? Check out our range.
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